Friday, September 27, 2013

Social Security Claiming and Psychology

New research shows that four strong psychological forces drive the decision about when to begin collecting Social Security. [September 26, 2013 - Squared Away - More]

Friday, September 09, 2011

Sir Ken Robinson Live Friday at 12EDT

As we celebrate our one-year anniversary this month on “Creativity in Play,” we are pleased to welcome back our very first guest – Sir Ken Robinson. Sir Ken is one of the leading thinkers on the role of creativity in education, work and society. His TED Talks have been viewed by millions and millions of people who care about making education a more-meaningful experience, as well as how creativity can engage people in purposeful learning, work and life. He is the author of The Element and Out of Our Minds. How has Sir Ken inspired your thinking about creativity and education?

Plus, we add theme music to the show today -- "Kindergarten," composed and performed by one of our previous guests, Jonathan Batiste.

Monday, September 05, 2011

The Creative Brain: Tonight on Charlie Rose

Tonight a rebroadcast of the Charlie Rose Brain Series Episode Twelve: the Creative Brain (10/28/10), a discussion about creativity with artists Richard Serra and Chuck Close, neurologist Oliver Sacks, Ann Temkin, chief curator of painting and sculpture at The Museum of Modern Art and Eric Kandel of Columbia University . [September 5 , 2011 - Charlie Rose - More]

Monday, June 13, 2011

Irish Poet in Creativity Workshops in Arts and Ideas Fest

The International Centre for Creativity and Imagination will be hosting Anne F. O'Reilly, a poet from Dublin, Ireland. O'Reilly's readings and performances will be featured in three experiential creativity workshops during the International Festival of Arts & Ideas in New Haven, Connecticut.

The public is invited to register now for the "Unleash Your Creativity" workshop series, which includes the themes of "Embodying Creativity: Engaging Creative Collaboration Through Movement and Play" on June 18, "Creativity in the Workplace: Engaging Creativity, Design and Innovation in Organizations" on June 21, and "Composing a Creative Life on Purpose: Engaging Meaning in Life and Work" on June 25. Details and registration information can be found online at <http://www.appliedimagination.org/artidea>.

The workshops will help participants explore their creativity, learn tools for new ways of thinking and problem solving, find alternatives, get unstuck, discover others who value creativity, and engage creativity in the workplace. O'Reilly will use her own poetry, as well as others', as a tool to help participants explore and understand the creative process and their own creativity.

In her book, Sacred Play: Soul-Journeys in Contemporary Irish Theatre, O'Reilly writes: "The truly liberating space is that of play, which can turn the world upside down, and enable a new imagining."

In the "Embodying Creativity" workshop on June 18, O'Reilly will share how play creates the space for creativity and transformation in individuals, in organizations and in communities. Participants will experience several play- and movement-based explorations of personal and group creativity with facilitators leading the Pilobolus method, InterPlay, the Alexander Technique and Developmental Transformations.

O'Reilly also is the author a book of poetry, Singing from the Belly of the Whale and a CD of her poems, "Breathsong." For more than 30 years, she has been teaching and facilitating workshops in spirituality, creative writing and sacred poetry. She was a senior lecturer in religious studies in St Patrick's College Drumcondra until 2008, when she took early retirement and began working as a performance poet, celebrating the healing and transforming power of poetry. She brings to this work many years' training with voice, poetry by heart, sacred clowning, drama and meditation. O'Reilly's participation in the Festival is supported by Imagine Ireland, an initiative of Culture Ireland celebrating a year of Irish arts in America 2011.

Additional facilitators in the "Unleash Your Creativity" workshop series include Renee Jaworski, Pilobolus dancer and associate artistic director; Lisa Laing, Certified InterPlay Leader; L'Ana Burton, director of CDC Creative Dance Continuum and teaching artist for the Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism; Rachel Bernsen, Certified Teacher of The Alexander Technique; Carol Pollard, associate director of the Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics; Dorie Shallcross, author of Intuition: An Inner Way of Knowing; Lisa Furman, artist and associate professor, Albertus Magnus College; Evie Lindemann, assistant professor/clinical coordinator master of arts in art therapy program, Albertus Magnus College; and Alice Forrester, executive director, Clifford Beers Child Guidance Clinic.

===

The "Unleash Your Creativity" series is curated by Steven Dahlberg, who heads the Connecticut-based International Centre for Creativity and Imagination and teaches "Creativity + Social Change" at the University of Connecticut. The centre is dedicated to applying creativity to improve the well-being of individuals, organizations and communities.

The series is presented by the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination, Albertus Magnus College, the Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, AIGA Connecticut, and Connecticut Creates, in partnership with International Festival of Arts & Ideas. Additional support comes from Imagine Ireland.

The mission of the International Festival of Arts & Ideas is to create an internationally renowned festival in New Haven, Conn., of the highest quality with world-class artists, thinkers and leaders, attracting and engaging a broad and diverse audience celebrating and building community and advancing economic development.

Friday, June 10, 2011

Fest Best Bets: Creativity Workshops and Yo-Yo Ma

What might happen when a designer, an educator, an arts therapist, a bioethicist, an Irish poet and a dancer come together to share their approaches to creativity? An explosion of opportunity for YOU to "Unleash Your Creativity" during this experiential workshop series -- named by The New Haven Register as one of five "Fest Best Bets," along with Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble.

The series is comprised of three separate-but-related workshops that will help you explore, develop and apply your creative thinking and imagination in life and work. The workshops are on June 18, 21 and 25 during the International Festival of Arts & Ideas in New Haven, Connecticut. People from all backgrounds and types of work are invited to come and experience these interdisciplinary sessions.

Few would dispute the importance of imagination, creativity and innovation in education, work and society. Yet, the challenge lies in how to best tap into people's creative thinking abilities and channel that creativity to learning better, working smarter and building community differently.

Creativity is a mindset that EVERYONE - not only artists - can cultivate. This series is designed to address the HOW of creativity. The workshops will provide practical, concrete tools for understanding your own creativity, as well as how to engage others' creativity. You will learn how to remove the blocks that keep you from applying your imagination, how to think in new ways, and how to put creative ideas into action.

***

Embodying Creativity: Engaging Creative Collaboration through Movement and Play
Saturday, June 18, 2011
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Albertus Magnus College

More Info | Register Now

"Movement" allows us to see things in new ways. It changes our perspective. It engages our bodies in learning and thinking. When we move with others, we are challenged to collaborate. Movement is a great metaphor for the entire process of creative thinking, which is a cyclic, moving process.

This workshop will help you deepen your creativity through facilitated movement and play experiences. It is open to everyone -- whether you routinely ignore your body's creativity or you are an experienced dancer. No previous dance experience is necessary to participate, but be prepared to move.

We will be led by:

    * Pilobolus Dancer and Associate Artistic Director Renee Jaworski on "The Pilobolus Creative Workshop"
    * InterPlay leaders Lisa Laing and L'Ana Burton on "Diving into the Deep End of the Creative Pool … or Dipping Your Toes in to Test the Waters: Exploring the Practical Tools of InterPlay to Unlock the Wisdom of Your Body"
    * Certified Alexander Technique Teacher and Artist Rachel Bernsen on "Freedom To Change: A Workshop in the Alexander Technique "
    * Clifford Beers Child Guidance Clinic Executive Director Alice Forrester on "Introduction to Developmental Transformations: Exploring the Use of Improvisation and Movement in Personal Growth"

Plus, the day will be introduced by Anne O'Reilly, poet and author of Sacred Play: Soul Journeys in Contemporary Irish Theatre. Anne joins us from Dublin, Ireland, with support from Imagine Ireland.

Sign up now! Registration includes a ticket to the International Festival of Arts & Ideas performance of Susan Marshall & Company's Adamantine.

Creativity in the Workplace: Engaging Creativity, Design and Innovation in Organizations
Tuesday, June 21, 2011
12 to 4 p.m.
Yale University School of Art

More Info | Register Now

Creativity, design thinking and innovation are among the most important tools that organizations can deploy for surviving and thriving in today's complex, global environment.

Organizations such as Google, 3M and Apple routinely are touted as the most creative workplaces. Yet EVERY organization can learn how to better tap into and unleash creativity in every individual.

This includes how to foster environments that support rather discourage creative ideas, how to enhance creative abilities in individuals across all departments, and how to apply creative processes for group collaboration and problem solving.

This workshop will engage you in the creative process through design thinking, poetry and applied imagination. It will help inspire personal creativity for organizational innovation in everyday work. You will learn practical techniques for real-world application.

Facilitators include:

    * International Centre for Creativity and Imagination Director Steven Dahlberg
    * Poet and Author Anne O'Reilly
    * AIGA Connecticut President Rich Hollant

People from business, education, nonprofits, government and other sectors are welcome to participate.

Sign up now! Registration includes a ticket to the International Festival of Arts & Ideas "Ideas: How Pleasure Works" lecture by Paul Bloom and performance of Jack Hitt's Making Up the Truth.

Composing a Creative Life on Purpose: Engaging Meaning in Life and Work
Saturday, June 25, 2011
9 a.m. to 4 p.m
Albertus Magnus College

More Info | Register Now

    "We have to realize that a creative being lives within ourselves, whether we like it or not, and that we must get out of its way, for it will give us no peace until we do." -- M. C. Richards

Creativity is a pathway into connecting our talents, passions and motivations to do what we love and what we are good at. Creativity helps us IMAGINE new possibilities, CONNECT with our purpose, and ENGAGE with others to make that purpose real.

Creativity is part of what makes us fundamentally human. When we have opportunities to discover and express that part of ourselves that makes us unique, we find joy and happiness and fulfillment. Sometimes we lose touch with this capacity. But it's not lost. It's still there - waiting for us to engage it again.

This workshop includes several hands-on/mind-on experiences for exploring your personal creativity, discovering meaning and purpose, and applying creativity to link your purpose to your life and work.

Facilitators include:

    * Albertus Magnus College Associate Professor and Artist Lisa Furman on "Community Weaving: Transforming Space with Hanging Art"
    * Albertus Magnus College Assistant Professor Evie Lindemann on "SoulCollage®: A Process for Exploring Purpose" and "The Mandala and the MARI"
    * Author of Intuition: An Inner Way of Knowing, Doris J. Shallcross on "Creativity, Intuition and Spirituality"
    * Yale University's Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics Associate Director Carol Pollard on "The Language of Drawing"
    * International Centre for Creativity and Imagination Director Steven Dahlberg on "Composing a Creative Life on Purpose"
    * Author and Poet Anne O'Reilly on "Freeing What Waits Within"

Sign up now! Registration includes a ticket to the International Festival of Arts & Ideas performance of David T. Little's Soldier Songs.

***

Help us spread the word about this exciting creativity series! Please forward this email, share the details on Facebook and Twitter, post the link <http://appliedimagination.org/artidea/> on your websites, and include it in your enewsletters. Thanks for your interest and support - and we hope to see YOU on June 18, 21 and 25! Don't forget to register now!

The Unleash Your Creativity series is presented by the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination, Albertus Magnus College, Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, AIGA Connecticut, and Connecticut Creates, in partnership with the International Festival of Arts & Ideas. Additional support provided by Imagine Ireland.

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Experiential Creativity Workshop Series at Arts & Ideas Festival - June in New Haven, Conn.

The International Festival of Arts and Ideas will feature “Unleash Your Creativity,” a series of three, experiential creativity workshops. The Festival runs from June 11 to 25, 2011, in New Haven, Conn. The workshops are June 18, 21 and 25.
The workshops will help participants explore their creativity, learn tools for new ways of thinking, find alternatives, get unstuck, discover others who value creativity, and engage creativity in the workplace. This series links the creativity of others with an in-depth opportunity to (re)discover and engage one’s own creativity and its applications to organizations and society. Full details about each workshop and its facilitators, along with registration information, can be found online (register here) or by email. The three workshops include:

  • At Albertus Magnus College: “Embodying Creativity: Engaging Creative Collaboration Through Movement and Play,” 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sat., June 18. This workshop features facilitators from Pilobolus Dance Theatre, InterPlay Connecticut, Clifford Beers Child Guidance Clinic, and the Alexander Technique, as well as Irish poet Anne O’Reilly who will explore how play creates the space for creativity and transformation. No previous dance experience is necessary to participate in this day, but be prepared to move. This workshop is $99 and includes the all-day workshop, lunch and a ticket to Susan Marshall Dance Company’s “Adamantine” at 5 p.m. on June 18. MORE
  • At Yale University School of Art: “Creativity in the Workplace: Engaging Creativity, Design and Innovation in Organizations,” 12 to 4 p.m. on Tues., June 21. This workshop features AIGA Connecticut President Rich Hollant, International Centre for Creativity and Imagination Director Steven Dahlberg, and Irish poet Anne O’Reilly. This workshop is $99 and includes the half-day workshop, a reception, Paul Bloom’s “Ideas: How Pleasure Works” lecture at 5:30 p.m., and a ticket to Jack Hitt’s “Making Up the Truth” at 8 p.m. on June 21. MORE
  • At Albertus Magnus College: “Composing a Creative Life on Purpose: Engaging Meaning in Life and Work,” 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sat., June 25. This workshop features facilitators who will lead hands-on experiences – in arts therapy, education, creativity, art, spirituality and intuition – that will help participants engage their creativity on purpose and for purpose. This workshop is $99 and includes the all-day workshop, lunch and a ticket to David T. Little’s “Soldier Songs” at 5 p.m. on June 25.  MORE
O’Reilly is a special guest from Dublin, Ireland, whose readings and performances will be uniquely featured in all three workshops. Her participation is supported by Imagine Ireland. O’Reilly is the author of the book, Sacred Play: Soul Journeys in Contemporary Irish Theatre; a book of poetry, Singing from the Belly of the Whale; and a CD of her poems, Breathsong.

Additional facilitators include Renee Jaworski, Pilobolus dancer and associate artistic director; Lisa Laing, Certified InterPlay Leader; L'Ana Burton, director of CDC Creative Dance Continuum and teaching artist for the Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism; Rachel Bernsen, Certified Teacher of The Alexander Technique; Carol Pollard, associate director of the Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics; Dorie Shallcross, author of Intuition: An Inner Way of Knowing; Lisa Furman, artist and associate professor, Albertus Magnus College; Evie Lindemann, assistant professor/clinical coordinator master of arts in art therapy program, Albertus Magnus College; and Alice Forrester, executive director, Clifford Beers Child Guidance Clinic.

The “Unleashing Your Creativity” Series is curated by Steven Dahlberg, who heads the Connecticut-based International Centre for Creativity and Imagination and teaches “Creativity + Social Change” at the University of Connecticut. The centre is dedicated to applying creativity to improve the well-being of individuals, organizations and communities.

The series is presented by the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination, Albertus Magnus College, the Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, and Connecticut Creates, in partnership with International Festival of Arts & Ideas.

The mission of the International Festival of Arts and Ideas is to create an internationally renowned festival in New Haven, Conn., of the highest quality with world-class artists, thinkers and leaders, attracting and engaging a broad and diverse audience celebrating and building community and advancing economic development.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Myth as 'what if?'

"It is a mistake to regard myth as an inferior mode of thought, which can be cast aside when human beings have attained the age of reason. Mythology is not an early attempt at history, and does not claim that its tales are objective fact. Like a novel, an opera or a ballet, myth is make-believe; it is a game that transfigures our fragmented, tragic world, and helps us to glimpse new possibilities by asking 'what if?' - a question which has also provoked some of our most important discoveries in philoso­phy, science and technology." -  Karen Armstrong (h/t MINemergent)

Thursday, March 10, 2011

A-Ha! The Neural Mechanisms Of Insight

Although it is quite common for a brief, unique experience to become part of our long-term memory, the underlying brain mechanisms associated with this type of learning are not well understood. Now, a new brain-imaging study looks at the neural activity associated with a specific type of rapid learning, insight. The research, published by Cell Press in the March 10 issue of the journal Neuron, reveals specific brain activity that occurs during an "A-ha!" moment that may help encode the new information in long-term memory. "In daily life, information that results from moments of insight is, almost by definition, incorporated in long-term memory: once we have realized a new way to solve a problem, or to perform a task better and faster, we are not likely to forget that insight easily," explains senior study author, Dr. Nava Rubin, from the Center for Neural Science at New York University. "We were interested in determining the neural basis of this long-lasting nature of insight." [9 March 2011 - Neuron/Cell Press via redOrbit - More]

Wednesday, January 05, 2011

Oliver Sacks says: This Year, Change Your Mind

... One does not have to be blind or deaf to tap into the brain’s mysterious and extraordinary power to learn, adapt and grow. I have seen hundreds of patients with various deficits -- strokes, Parkinson’s and even dementia -- learn to do things in new ways, whether consciously or unconsciously, to work around those deficits. That the brain is capable of such radical adaptation raises deep questions. To what extent are we shaped by, and to what degree do we shape, our own brains? And can the brain’s ability to change be harnessed to give us greater cognitive powers? The experiences of many people suggest that it can. ... Neuroplasticity — the brain’s capacity to create new pathways — is a crucial part of recovery for anyone who loses a sense or a cognitive or motor ability. But it can also be part of everyday life for all of us. While it is often true that learning is easier in childhood, neuroscientists now know that the brain does not stop growing, even in our later years. Every time we practice an old skill or learn a new one, existing neural connections are strengthened and, over time, neurons create more connections to other neurons. Even new nerve cells can be generated. ... Whether it is by learning a new language, traveling to a new place, developing a passion for beekeeping or simply thinking about an old problem in a new way, all of us can find ways to stimulate our brains to grow, in the coming year and those to follow. Just as physical activity is essential to maintaining a healthy body, challenging one’s brain, keeping it active, engaged, flexible and playful, is not only fun. It is essential to cognitive fitness. [31 December 2010 - New York Times - By Oliver Sacks - More]

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

A Positive Mood Allows Your Brain to Think More Creatively

People who watch funny videos on the internet at work aren't necessarily wasting time. They may be taking advantage of the latest psychological science--putting themselves in a good mood so they can think more creatively.

"Generally, positive mood has been found to enhance creative problem solving and flexible yet careful thinking," says Ruby Nadler, a graduate student at the University of Western Ontario. She and colleagues Rahel Rabi and John Paul Minda carried out a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. For this study, Nadler and her colleagues looked at a particular kind of learning that is improved by creative thinking.

Students who took part in the study were put into different moods and then given a category learning task to do (they learned to classify sets of pictures with visually complex patterns). The researchers manipulated mood with help from music clips and video clips; first, they tried several out to find out what made people happiest and saddest. The happiest music was a peppy Mozart piece, and the happiest video was of a laughing baby. The researchers then used these in the experiment, along with sad music and video (a piece of music from Schindler's List and a news report about an earthquake) and a piece of music and a video that didn't affect mood. After listening to the music and watching the video, people had to try to learn to recognize a pattern.

Happy volunteers were better at learning a rule to classify the patterns than sad or neutral volunteers. "If you have a project where you want to think innovatively, or you have a problem to carefully consider, being in a positive mood can help you to do that," Nadler says. And music is an easy way to get into a good mood. Everyone has a different type of music that works for them--don't feel like you have to switch to Mozart, she says.

Nadler also thinks this may be a reason why people like to watch funny videos at work. “I think people are unconsciously trying to put themselves in a positive mood”--so that apparent time-wasting may actually be good news for employers. [15 December 2010 - Association for Psychological Science - More]

Monday, November 22, 2010

The Mad Artist's Brain: The Connection between Creativity and Mental Illness

More evidence for the long-suspected physiological link between inventiveness and mental illness ... The popular perception of creative thinkers and artists is that they often also have mental disorders -- the likes of Vincent van Gogh or Sylvia Plath suggest that creativity and madness go hand in hand. Past research has tentatively confirmed a correlation; scientific surveys have found that highly creative people are more likely to have mental illness in their family, indicating a genetic link. Now a study from Sweden is the first to suggest a biological mechanism: highly creative healthy people and people with schizophrenia have certain brain chemistry features in common. A research team at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm studied 13 mentally healthy, highly creative men and women. As noted in the paper published in May in PLoS ONE, other scientists had previously found that divergent thinking, or the ability to “think outside the box,” involves the brain’s dopamine communication system. The Swedish research team used PET scanning to determine the abundance of a particular dopamine receptor, or sensor, in the creative individuals’ thalamus and striatum, areas that process and sort information before it reaches conscious thought -- and that are known to be involved in schizophrenia. The team found that people who had lower levels of dopamine receptor activity in the thalamus also had higher scores on tests of divergent thinking -- for instance, finding many solutions to a problem. Previous work has shown that people with schizophrenia also have lower dopamine receptor activity in the thalamus -- and the scientists suggest in their paper that this striking similarity demonstrates a “crucial” link between creativity and psychopathology. “Thinking outside the box might be facilitated by having a somewhat less intact box,” writes lead author Fredrik Ullén, a cognitive scientist at Karolinska. [22 November 2010 - Scientific American - By Elizabeth King Humphrey - More]

Friday, November 19, 2010

National Creativity Network Launched in Oklahoma City

In conjunction with the seventh annual Creativity World Forum 2010 held in Oklahoma City, November 15-17, the National Creativity Network officially launched at a special meeting with Founding Chair, Sir Ken Robinson, on November 15 from 9:00-11:30 am at the Skirvin Hilton Hotel.

For two years, creativity and innovation leaders in the U.S. have gathered with Sir Ken Robinson and leaders in Oklahoma who began a statewide creativity movement, Creative Oklahoma, linking education, commerce and cultural efforts, in 2006. On November 15, representatives from the states of Wisconsin, New Jersey, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Colorado, Massachusetts, Connecticut and New York joined with Oklahoma leaders to announce the formation of a new National Creativity Network, linking statewide and regional creativity initiatives in the United States.

The National Creativity Network will facilitate the exchange of ideas, share best practices, and encourage collaboration among partnering geographic districts committed to creativity and innovation in America across the three sectors of education, commerce, and culture. Network members are committed to the urgent need in the U.S. to nurture and promote the development and expression of creativity and innovation, in education, in business and in the community; ideas and actions so that America can remain a world leader in innovation, discovery, free enterprise, and learning.

“As the pace of change quickens around the world, many communities throughout America are facing powerful economic challenges. In addition to the recession, they include the decline of old industries and the need to generate new forms of businesses and employment. Patterns of community life also continues to change and evolve, causing social challenges,” explains Sir Ken Robinson, Author of The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything and Founding Chairman, National Creativity Network.

“To face these challenges, we must develop high levels of imagination. Throughout the country there are many regions that are rising magnificently to these challenges. The purpose of the National Creativity Network is to connect these regions so that they can support and enrich each other's work and promote the vital spirit of economic and social innovation across the whole United States," said Robinson.

The National Creativity Network will be based in Oklahoma City with a national board. Sir Ken Robinson is the Founding Chair and George Tzougros, Executive Director of the Wisconsin Arts Board, is the Board Chairman.

NATIONAL CREATIVITY NETWORK BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Sir Ken Robinson, Founding Chairperson, NCN
International Creativity, Innovation, and Human Resources Consultant
California

Dennis Cheek, Ph.D.
Senior Fellow
Foreign Policy Research Institute
Pennsylvania

Steven Dahlberg
Director
International Centre for Creativity and Imagination
Connecticut

Carrie Fitzsimmons
Executive Director
ArtScience Labs
Massachusetts

Jean Hendrickson
Executive Director
Oklahoma A+ Schools/University of Central Oklahoma

Wendy Liscow
Program Officer
Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation
New Jersey

Susan McCalmont
Executive Director
Kirkpatrick Foundation
Oklahoma

Robert Morrison
Founder
Quadrant Arts Education Research
New Jersey

Scott Noppe Brandon
Executive Director
Lincoln Center Institute
New York

David O’Fallon
President
Minnesota Humanities Center

Mark Robertson
Attorney
Robertson & Williams
Oklahoma

Susan Sclafani
Director, State Services
National Center on Education and the Economy
Washington, DC

George Tzougros
Executive Director
Wisconsin Arts Board

[15 November 2010 - Creative Oklahoma For more information, contact: Kathy Oden-Hall, Creative Oklahoma, 405-203-5742, kodenhall@stateofcreativity.com]

Friday, October 08, 2010

Pilobolus on Creativity - LIVE Friday at noon EDT

Pilobolus' Itamar Kubovy on Connecting the Creative Process in the
Studio and the Organization ... on Creativity in Play, 8 October 2010,
12:00 p.m. Eastern ... listen LIVE online at
http://www.creativityinplay.com or via telephone at +1 347 826 7082.

Pilobolus is an arts organization that operates with a principle of
"radical democracy" - where everyone's creativity matters. Their
challenge to themselves is to reflect that process in not only how they
create and perform dance, but in how they run the organization itself as
an organic, creative entity. We'll explore what lessons other
organizations can learn from the Pilobolus experience, as well as the
importance of movement in creativity. Itamar will participate in the
Creativity World Forum in Oklahoma City, November 15-17, 2010. Discover
more about Pilobolus at: http://www.pilobolus.com

ABOUT CREATIVITY IN PLAY: Exploring the importance of creativity, play
and imagination across society. Hosted by Steven Dahlberg (International
Centre for Creativity and Imagination) and Mary Alice Long, Ph.D.
(Play=Peace). Produced by the International Centre for Creativity and
Imagination, in partnership with the National Creativity Network. ...
'The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but
by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind
plays with the objects it loves.' – Carl Jung

Saturday, September 25, 2010

Engaged in What You Love - bell hooks on writing

It's the birthday of writer and activist bell hooks, born Gloria Jean
Watkins in Hopkinsville, Kentucky (1952). Her father was a janitor, and
her mother cleaned homes for white people. She went to a segregated
school until she was 10. ... She said: "Writing is my passion. It is a
way to experience the ecstatic. The root understanding of the word
ecstasy—'to stand outside'—comes to me in those moments when I am
immersed so deeply in the act of thinking and writing that everything
else, even flesh, falls away." [25 September 2010 - The Writer's Almanac]

Thursday, September 16, 2010

CREATIVITY NETWORKING: Creativity and Sustainability in Communities ... with Creativity Educator Steven Dahlberg and Community Farmer/Educator David Cherniske

If you are interested in food, "local" and sustainable agriculture, come and explore the symbiotic relationship between creativity and sustainability. Challenge yourself to think in new ways and imagine new possibilities about food, agriculture and the environment. Explore how creative thinking helps us understand systems, connections and alternatives better as we consider what we eat, how we eat, where food comes from and the impact of all of this on the environment. Led by creativity educator Steven Dahlberg, community farmer/educator David Cherniske and additional guests from local food and sustainable farm projects.

=====================
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2010, 2:00-3:30 P.M.
The Silo at Hunt Hill Farm,
New Milford, Connecticut 06776
$10 to Creativity Networking; open to all.
RSVP to: 860.355.0300 or news [at] appliedimagination [dot] org

Please help spread the word about this workshop by printing and posting this flyer:
http://appliedimagination.org/sept2010.pdf
=====================

MORE ABOUT WORKSHOP LEADERS AND CREATIVITY NETWORKING:

  • Steven Dahlberg is director of the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination, which is dedicated to applying creativity to improve the well-being of individuals, organizations and communities. He teaches "Creativity + Social Change" at the University of Connecticut, and leads professional development workshops for educators, nonprofits and businesses. He facilitates creative thinking and problem solving sessions, writes about creativity, and contributes to various media about creativity, imagination and innovation. He currently curates a monthly Creativity Networking series in Connecticut and organizes Imagination Conversations in Connecticut as part of a national initiative of the Lincoln Center Institute. He has worked with Yale University, Guggenheim Museum, Yahoo!, Americans for the Arts, Danbury Public Schools, World Knowledge Forum, City of Providence, 3M, Aldrich Museum, State of Connecticut, and Rhode Island College, among other organizations. He helped toy inventors launch a creativity consulting business and taught an undergraduate creativity course for incarcerated men. He is particularly interested in creative education, creative community building, local food and sustainable agriculture, and creative aging. Find more at http://www.appliedimagination.org.
  • David Cherniske is a community farmer and educator. He is currently collaborating with middle school students on a garden project at the Pratt Nature Center in New Milford, Connecticut. He has a deep interest in integrating age-old farming practices with cutting-edge thinking about farming, agriculture, land and animals. Find more at http://www.prattcenter.org.
The Creativity Networking Series is presented each month by The Silo at Hunt Hill Farm and the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination, both based in New Milford, Conn. The series provides a forum for exploring the many facets of creativity and for discovering other people interested in creativity.
http://www.appliedimagination.org
http://www.hunthillfarmtrust.org

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Sir Ken Robinson to be First Guest on 'Creativity in Play' Radio Show

We are pleased to announce that Sir Ken Robinson will be the inaugural guest on the new Creativity in Play online radio show, which will debut at noon Eastern Daylight Time (-4 UTC) on Thursday, September 23. Hosts are Steven Dahlberg (International Centre for Creativity and Imagination) and Mary Alice Long (Play=Peace). Sir Ken will also be part of the opening session with Daniel Pink at the Creativity World Forum on November 16, 2010, in Oklahoma City. Creativity in Play is produced by the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination, in partnership with the National Creativity Network. [14 September 2010 - International Centre for Creativity and Imagination - More]

Wednesday, September 08, 2010

SELF RESPECT LOST ALONG WITH JOBS IN RECESSION

Among long-term unemployed adults, "nearly four-in-ten (38%) ... report they have lost some self-respect while out of work, compared with 29% who were jobless for shorter periods of time," according to a 2010 Pew survey of adults unemployed during the recession. "The long-term unemployed also are significantly more likely to say they sought professional help for depression or other emotional issues while out of work (24% vs. 10% for those unemployed less than three months)." (Morin, R., & Kochbar, R. (2010). The impact of long-term unemployment: Lost income, lost friends--and loss of self-respect. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center.) More [7 September 2010 - Pew Research Center via Boston College Sloan Center on Aging & Work]

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

The Creativity Crisis ... Explored

Stay tuned in the coming days for my new online radio show, Creativity in Play, co-hosted with play expert Mary Alice Long and produced in partnership with the National Creativity Network. First guest on deck ... Po Bronson, co-author of the Newsweek article, "The Creativity Crisis."

Monday, June 07, 2010

Pilobolus on Creativity and Everyday Movement ... at June Creativity Networking in Connecticut

The next monthly Creativity Networking session will feature Pilobolus and their take on creativity and everyday movement. The workshop will be Sunday, June 20, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at The Silo at Hunt Hill Farm, 44 Upland Road, in New Milford, Conn. Creativity Networking is open to all and admission is $10. For more information or to RSVP, go to http://appliedimagination.org/networking or call 860-355-0300.

Renee Jaworski, rehearsal director and artistic associate for Pilobolus Dance Theatre, will lead the session on "Discovering Creativity Through Everyday Movement," along with Steven Dahlberg, curator of the Creativity Networking series.

Jaworski has performed and taught for MOMIX, Group Motion, and Carolyn Dorfman. She has been dancing, teaching and choreographing with Pilobolus since 2000. Dahlberg is director of the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination, which is dedicated to applying creativity to improve the well-being of individuals, organizations and communities. He also teaches the "Creativity + Social Change" course at the University of Connecticut.

"Some people need to move their bodies to think, while other people think their bodies are incapable of moving," says Dahlberg, host of Creativity Networking. "Yet, we are made to move. It's a fundamental aspect of who we are and what we do everyday. Sometimes, however, we lose touch with this capacity."

The public is invited to explore creativity and movement -- in two parts. First, see Pilobolus perform free at Hartford's Riverfront Recapture stage (riverfront.org/events/performances) at 7 p.m. on June 19. Then, attend the Creativity Networking workshop the following afternoon at 2 p.m. on June 20, in which participants will explore how movement and play can help them tap into more of their creativity and reconnect with their physical selves. The workshop -- led by a master of movement from Pilobolus -- seeks to inspire, provoke and encourage people to enhance their creativity and communication through everyday movement. The session will be part Pilobolus story, part creative process and part experiential ... and is open to everyone, no special skills required.

The Creativity Networking Series is presented each month by the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination and The Silo at Hunt Hill Farm, both based in New Milford, Conn. The series provides a forum for exploring the many facets of creativity and for discovering and networking with other people interested in creativity. Find more at http://appliedimagination.org and http://hunthillfarmtrust.org.

Pilobolus began in 1971 as an outsider dance company, and quickly became renowned the world over for its imaginative and athletic exploration of creative collaboration. Nearly 40 years later, it has evolved into a pioneering American cultural institution of the 21st century. The Pilobolus Dance Theatre is the umbrella for a series of radically innovative and globally acclaimed concert dance companies. Find more at http://pilobolus.org.

==========================
SUMMARY - CREATIVITY NETWORKING:
Creativity and Everyday Movement ... with Pilobolus

SUNDAY, JUNE 20, 2010, 2:00-3:30 P.M.
The Silo at Hunt Hill Farm, New Milford, Connecticut 06776
$10 to Creativity Networking; open to all.
RSVP to: 860.355.0300 or news [at] appliedimagination [dot] org
More at: http://appliedimagination.org/networking
Print and post: http://appliedimagination.org/june2010.pdf
==========================

[Photo above by (c)John Kane.]

Labels: , , ,

The next monthly Creativity Networking session will feature Pilobolus and their take on creativity and everyday movement. The workshop will be Sunday, June 20, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at The Silo at Hunt Hill Farm, 44 Upland Road, in New Milford, Conn. Creativity Networking is open to all and admission is $10. For more information or to RSVP, go to http://appliedimagination.org/networking or call 860-355-0300.

Renee Jaworski, rehearsal director and artistic associate for Pilobolus Dance Theatre, will lead the session on "Discovering Creativity Through Everyday Movement," along with Steven Dahlberg, curator of the Creativity Networking series.

Jaworski has performed and taught for MOMIX, Group Motion, and Carolyn Dorfman. She has been dancing, teaching and choreographing with Pilobolus since 2000. Dahlberg is director of the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination, which is dedicated to applying creativity to improve the well-being of individuals, organizations and communities. He also teaches the "Creativity + Social Change" course at the University of Connecticut.

"Some people need to move their bodies to think, while other people think their bodies are incapable of moving," says Dahlberg, host of Creativity Networking. "Yet, we are made to move. It's a fundamental aspect of who we are and what we do everyday. Sometimes, however, we lose touch with this capacity."

The public is invited to explore creativity and movement -- in two parts. First, see Pilobolus perform free at Hartford's Riverfront Recapture stage (riverfront.org/events/performances) at 7 p.m. on June 19. Then, attend the Creativity Networking workshop the following afternoon at 2 p.m. on June 20, in which participants will explore how movement and play can help them tap into more of their creativity and reconnect with their physical selves. The workshop -- led by a master of movement from Pilobolus -- seeks to inspire, provoke and encourage people to enhance their creativity and communication through everyday movement. The session will be part Pilobolus story, part creative process and part experiential ... and is open to everyone, no special skills required.

The Creativity Networking Series is presented each month by the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination and The Silo at Hunt Hill Farm, both based in New Milford, Conn. The series provides a forum for exploring the many facets of creativity and for discovering and networking with other people interested in creativity. Find more at http://appliedimagination.org and http://hunthillfarmtrust.org.

Pilobolus began in 1971 as an outsider dance company, and quickly became renowned the world over for its imaginative and athletic exploration of creative collaboration. Nearly 40 years later, it has evolved into a pioneering American cultural institution of the 21st century. The Pilobolus Dance Theatre is the umbrella for a series of radically innovative and globally acclaimed concert dance companies. Find more at http://pilobolus.org.

==========================
SUMMARY - CREATIVITY NETWORKING:

Creativity and Everyday Movement ... with Pilobolus

SUNDAY, JUNE 20, 2010, 2:00-3:30 P.M. The Silo at Hunt Hill Farm, New Milford, Connecticut 06776 $10 to Creativity Networking; open to all. RSVP to: 860.355.0300 or news@appliedimagination.org More at: http://appliedimagination.org/networking Print and post: http://appliedimagination.org/june2010.pdf ==========================

[Photo above by (c)John Kane.]

Labels: , , ,

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Ken Robinson ... TED Part II

Ken Robinson returned to TED earlier this year and talked about the intersection of talents, passion and education.

[May 2010 - TED] In this poignant, funny follow-up to his fabled 2006 talk, Sir Ken Robinson makes the case for a radical shift from standardized schools to personalized learning -- creating conditions where kids' natural talents can flourish. More


As he did in his first TED talk about creativity and education, he sums up in less than 18 minutes key ideas that seem so obvious, yet are so far from the practices we employ in schools and society. Some of Ken's insights from his 2010 talk:
  • There is a crisis of human resources -- we make poor use of our talents.
  • Many people simply endure what they do rather than enjoy what they do.
  • But some people do what they ARE and engage part of their authentic selves.
  • Education dislocates people from their natural talents.
  • We have to create the circumstances where talents show themselves. Education should be where this happens, but too often it's not.
  • Education REFORM is not enough -- reform is only improving a broken model.
  • We need not an evolution in education, but a revolution ... to transform it into something else.
  • It needs innovation, which is hard because it challenges what we take for granted.
  • Quoting Abraham Lincoln, Ken talked about "rising with the occasion" and the idea of "disenthralling ourselves."
  • Life is organic ... not linear.
  • We are obsessed with getting people to college. College does not begin in kindergarten. Kindergarten begins in kindergarten.
  • Problem of conformity in education -- like fast food where everything is standardized.
  • Human talent is tremendously diverse.
  • Passion -- what excites our spirit and energy -- is important.
  • Education doesn't feed a lot of people's spirits.
  • Education, which is primarily based on a manufacturing model, should shift to one based on principles from agriculture.
  • Human flourishing is an organic process. We cannot predict the outcome of human development. All you can do is create the conditions under which they begin to flourish.
  • Customizing and personalizing education is the answer to the future.
And he finished with a poem excerpt from W. B. Yeats about how we spread our dreams before others' feet -- like kids do everyday -- and askied us to "tread softly, because you tread on my dreams."

If you care about the future of children and education and society, show Ken's two TED talks (and this one, too!) to your friends and colleagues and family and talk about how you can begin to act to make positive change in the ways we educate and work. Show these clips in a public meeting at your children's school. Show them in your workplace with your colleagues. Show them at the public library. You'll be amazed who cares about these topics, who shows up and what you might accomplish together. Imagine what if ...

Labels: , , , ,

Monday, May 24, 2010

REMINDER - Connecticut Imagination Conversation Tonight in Hartford

* Join panelists for a CONNECTICUT IMAGINATION CONVERSATION on Unleashing and Harnessing the Imagination in Learning and Work *
THE INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR CREATIVITY AND IMAGINATION AND THE STUDIO @ BILLINGS FORGE PRESENT IMAGINATION CONVERSATIONS: A PROJECT OF LINCOLN CENTER INSTITUTE
==========================
MONDAY, MAY 24, 2010, 7:00-9:00 P.M.
The Studio @ Billings Forge,
539-563 Broad Street
Hartford, Connecticut 06106
Free and open to the public.
RSVP: <http://www.eventbrite.com/event/665180573>
MORE INFO: conversation@appliedimagination.org or
<http://appliedimagination.org/conversation/>

Imagination Conversations bring together citizens from diverse fields -- including education, business, government, arts and nonprofits -- to explore the importance of imagination in life, work and society. Connecticut has a long tradition of creativity, invention and innovation, but the current economic downturn and increased worldwide competition mean that we cannot take our position for granted. Now more than ever, we must nurture imagination in our schools, create
environments for innovation in workplaces, and build cultures for creativity in our communities. Bring your "imagination story" to the second Connecticut Imagination Conversation on May 24. This conversation is part of a national dialogue -- 50 conversations in 50 states -- sponsored by the Lincoln Center Institute to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. Join moderators Steven Dahlberg, Director, International Centre for Creativity and Imagination, and Janice La Motta, Program Coordinator, The Studio @ Billings Forge, plus invited guests and citizens from across Connecticut who care about the role of imagination and creativity in society. Guests include Sue Sturtevant, Executive Director and CEO of the Hill-Stead Museum, and Marie O'Brien, President of the Connecticut Development Authority.

ABOUT THE IMAGINATION CONVERSATIONS NATIONALLY:
Imagination, the ability to visualize new possibilities, is a prerequisite for success in the 21st-century global economy. The Imagination Conversations prepare us for the future that requires imagination by:

  • Building national awareness of imagination as a vital tool in work and in life.
  • Sparking dialogue about imagination across the professional spectrum.
  • Leading to the creation of an action plan to make imagination an integral part of American education.

The Imagination Conversations, a project of Lincoln Center Institute and a part of the Lincoln Center 50 Years celebration, run from the fall of 2009 to the spring of 2011. Many are hosted by state government, business, and cultural leaders. They feature diverse groups of panelists with distinctive perspectives and draw a wide range of audience members from the public and private sectors. Moderators facilitate the conversations, some of which reach viewers nationwide via live and archived streaming video. This two-year initiative will culminate in America's Imagination Summit, to be held at Lincoln Center in the summer or fall of 2011.

Labels: , , , ,

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Imagination Conversation to be Held Monday in Hartford; Part of National Initiative

THE INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR CREATIVITY AND IMAGINATION AND THE STUDIO @
BILLINGS FORGE PRESENT IMAGINATION CONVERSATIONS: A PROJECT OF LINCOLN
CENTER INSTITUTE
* Join panelists for a CONNECTICUT IMAGINATION CONVERSATION on
Unleashing and Harnessing the Imagination in Learning and Work *
==========================
MONDAY, MAY 24, 2010, 7:00-9:00 P.M.
The Studio @ Billings Forge,
539-563 Broad Street
Hartford, Connecticut 06106
Free and open to the public.
RSVP: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/665180573
MORE INFO: conversation@appliedimagination.org or
http://appliedimagination.org/conversation/
==========================

Imagination Conversations bring together citizens from diverse fields --
including education, business, government, arts and nonprofits -- to
explore the importance of imagination in life, work and society.
Connecticut has a long tradition of creativity, invention and
innovation, but the current economic downturn and increased worldwide
competition mean that we cannot take our position for granted. Now more
than ever, we must nurture imagination in our schools, create
environments for innovation in workplaces, and build cultures for
creativity in our communities. Bring your "imagination story" to the
second Connecticut Imagination Conversation on May 24. This conversation
is part of a national dialogue -- 50 conversations in 50 states --
sponsored by the Lincoln Center Institute to celebrate the 50th
anniversary of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. Join
moderators Steven Dahlberg, Director, International Centre for
Creativity and Imagination, and Janice La Motta, Program Coordinator,
The Studio @ Billings Forge, plus invited guests and citizens from
across Connecticut who care about the role of imagination and creativity
in society.

ABOUT THE IMAGINATION CONVERSATIONS NATIONALLY:
Imagination, the ability to visualize new possibilities, is a
prerequisite for success in the 21st-century global economy. The
Imagination Conversations prepare us for the future that requires
imagination by:

* Building national awareness of imagination as a vital tool in
work and in life.
* Sparking dialogue about imagination across the professional spectrum.
* Leading to the creation of an action plan to make imagination an
integral part of American education.

The Imagination Conversations, a project of Lincoln Center Institute and
a part of the Lincoln Center 50 Years celebration, run from the fall of
2009 to the spring of 2011. Many are hosted by state government,
business, and cultural leaders. They feature diverse groups of panelists
with distinctive perspectives and draw a wide range of audience members
from the public and private sectors. Moderators facilitate the
conversations, some of which reach viewers nationwide via live and
archived streaming video. This two-year initiative will culminate in
America's Imagination Summit, to be held at Lincoln Center in the summer
or fall of 2011.

Creativity linked to mental health

[18 May 2010 - Karolinska Institutet via EurekAlert!] New research shows a possible explanation for the link between mental health and creativity. By studying receptors in the brain, researchers at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet have managed to show that the dopamine system in healthy, highly creative people is similar in some respects to that seen in people with schizophrenia. High creative skills have been shown to be somewhat more common in people who have mental illness in the family. Creativity is also linked to a slightly higher risk of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Certain psychological traits, such as the ability to make unusual pr bizarre associations are also shared by schizophrenics and healthy, highly creative people. And now the correlation between creativity and mental health has scientific backing. "We have studied the brain and the dopamine D2 receptors, and have shown that the dopamine system of healthy, highly creative people is similar to that found in people with schizophrenia," says associate professor Fredrik Ullén from Karolinska Institutet's Department of Women's and Children's Health. Just which brain mechanisms are responsible for this correlation is still something of a mystery, but Dr Ullén conjectures that the function of systems in the brain that use dopamine is significant; for example, studies have shown that dopamine receptor genes are linked to ability for divergent thought. Dr Ullén's study measured the creativity of healthy individuals using divergent psychological tests, in which the task was to find many different solutions to a problem. "The study shows that highly creative people who did well on the divergent tests had a lower density of D2 receptors in the thalamus than less creative people," says Dr Ullén. "Schizophrenics are also known to have low D2 density in this part of the brain, suggesting a cause of the link between mental illness and creativity." More - Press Release | More - Article

Thursday, May 06, 2010

On Imagination

"Your imagination is your preview to life's coming attractions." --
Albert Einstein

Monday, April 19, 2010

Connecticut Imagination Conversation - Tonight in Hartford

Join us tonight for the Connecticut Imagination Conversation at 6 p.m.
in Hartford! More information and RSVP:
http://appliedimagination.org/conversation

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Imagination Conversation Set for Connecticut, April 19 in Hartford

CONNECTICUT TO EXPLORE CRITICAL ROLE OF IMAGINATION AS KEY TO FLOURISHING SOCIETY ... Connecticut Imagination Conversation is Part of 50-State Effort to Raise Awareness of Imagination: Why It Matters and How to Develop It in Our Lives and in Our Communities.

On April 19, 2010, the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination and the University of Connecticut, in affiliation with Lincoln Center Institute for the Arts in Education (LCI), will hold an Imagination Conversation at 7:00 p.m. at the University of Connecticut Greater Hartford Campus.

The Conversation will bring together leaders from an array of fields -- government, business, science, education, and the arts -- to explore the ways they experience and promote imagination in their work and communities. The goal of the Conversation is to present imagination as a key cognitive capacity, one that leads to creativity and innovation; and to help build awareness of imagination as a key skill in work and in life.

It is LCI's contention, as well as that of numerous scientists, government leaders, and educators, that imagination must be taught to children in our schools and nurtured in our communities. Applying imagination is crucial if Americans are to not only compete in the 21st-century marketplace, but create positive, flourishing communities that continually engage every citizen's creativity, imagination and ideas.

The Imagination Conversation will be in the auditorium of the Library Building at the University of Connecticut Greater Hartford Campus, 1800 Asylum Ave., West Hartford, Conn., 06117. The event begins with networking at 6 p.m. and the Imagination Conversation at 7 p.m. More details, along with parking and registration information, are available at:
http://www.appliedimagination.org

The Imagination Conversation is open to the public and will be recorded for broadcast on WNPR's Where We Live on Friday, April 23, at 9 a.m. WNPR's John Dankosky will moderate the Conversation with guests Steven Dahlberg and Scott Noppe-Brandon. Dahlberg is head of the New Milford, Conn.-based International Centre for Creativity and Imagination (ICCI) and teaches "Creativity + Social Change" at the University of Connecticut. Noppe-Brandon is executive director of Lincoln Center Institute and author of "Imagination First: Unlocking the Power of Possibility." Artists John O'Donnell and Ted Efremoff will visually map and document the Conversation while it happens. Students from the "Creativity + Social Change" class, invited participants from diverse sectors across the state, and the general public will also be involved in the Conversation.

This Conversation will focus on the role of imagination in education, creative community and economic development, and creative leadership in organizations. It seeks to build a relevant imagination-fueled agenda for the state to pursue. ICCI will coordinate follow-up action that emerges from this conversation, as well as additional future conversations.

“Creativity and imagination matter in every aspect of society,” says Dahlberg. “Imagination matters for engaging students and teachers in meaningful education. It matters for bringing new ideas into reality to improve the economy. And it matters for helping people express their creative capacities in their work and their communities. We hope to help connect people who want to tap into more of their imagination and apply it for creating positive change across this state.”

Imagination Conversations are expected to take place during the next two years in each of the 50 states. All of the Conversations will be documented and final proposals for nationwide educational reform will be made at a national Imagination Summit in New York in the summer or fall of 2011. At the Summit, Imagination Conversation findings and an action agenda will be presented to public policy makers, educators, legislators and the media in an effort to make cultivation of imagination a key element in our schools.

"Imagination can be described as having the ability to visualize new possibilities and the ability to ask, 'what if ...?'" says Noppe-Brandon. "Developing students' imaginations and teaching them to proceed from imaginative thinking to creative action is vital if they are to meet the challenges of today's world. If the United States is to maintain its position at the vanguard of innovation, it needs a workforce capable of finding fresh solutions to challenges and inventing groundbreaking products and services. LCI understands that imaginative learning in schools will produce such a population."

ICCI is dedicated to applying creativity to improve the well-being of individuals, organizations and communities. It promotes imagination and creativity through public events such as the monthly Creativity Networking series; professional development training for educators and business people; advocacy for creativity topics in local, national and international conferences; dissemination of creativity ideas through writing and commentary in various media; and teaching and guest lecturing at various universities.

The University of Connecticut's Bachelor of General Studies Program encourages imagination, collaboration and democratic participation through its Public and Community Engagement-themed courses in Storrs and Hartford and online.

Having recognized the global importance of imagination early on, LCI has established itself as a leader in the implementation of a method by which imagination is introduced into classrooms and used across the curriculum. Through the hands-on study of works of art, students develop their capacities to think imaginatively and critically, which serve them in all subject areas. With its programs reaching an estimated 390,000 students per year through its partnerships with schools across the U.S. and abroad, LCI is making an impact on the direction of education not just in New York but all over the world.

ABOUT THE HOSTING ORGANIZATIONS:
About Steven Dahlberg and the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination:
Steven Dahlberg is director of the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination, which is dedicated to applying creativity to improve the well-being of individuals, organizations and communities. He teaches "Creativity + Social Change" in the Public and Community Engagement theme at the University of Connecticut. He has nearly 20 years of experience in this field, and has worked with Yale University, Guggenheim Museum, Yahoo!, Americans for the Arts, Danbury Public Schools, UNESCO, Louisiana's Office of the Lt. Governor, New Economics Foundation, Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism, World Knowledge Forum, City of Providence, 3M, Aldrich Museum, State of Connecticut, and Rhode Island College, among other organizations. He has helped toy inventors launch a creativity consulting business, directed an international creativity conference, and taught an undergraduate creativity course for incarcerated men. Dahlberg edits the Applied Imagination blog, authored the foreword to the book, Education is Everybody's Business. He is particularly interested in creative community building, creative education, local food and sustainable agriculture, and creative aging.

About Lincoln Center Institute (LCI):
LCI is the educational cornerstone of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Inc., and is the model for arts education programs across the U.S. and abroad. Founded in 1975, the Institute is known for its inventive repertory, and brings music, dance, theater, visual arts, and architecture into classrooms in the New York City area, across the nation, and around the world. In more than three decades of outreach, LCI's approach has reached more than 20 million students, teachers, administrators, parents, community members and professors of education worldwide. The number is projected to increase in the next few years, thanks to LCI's highly successful professional development programs and Internet presence.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

Monday, April 05, 2010

ARTISTS IN TRANSITION CONFERENCE / APRIL CREATIVITY NETWORKING

CREATIVITY NETWORKING ... Special Off-Site, Co-Located Program with the
ARTISTS IN TRANSITION CONFERENCE IN DANBURY, CONNECTICUT ... Steven
Dahlberg to lead a workshop on 'Creative Thinking, Aging and Living:
Engaging our Strengths, Living our Purpose'
==========================
SUNDAY, APRIL 11, 2010, 12:00-5:00 P.M.
Westside Campus Center Building, Western Connecticut State University, 3
University Boulevard, Danbury, Connecticut 06810.
$25/person (Save $15 ... enter "Creativity Networking" in the "how did
you learn about the conference?" on the registration form and pay the
usual $10 Creativity Networking fee!) Questions? Email
artistsintransition@yahoo.com
==========================

Artists in Transition Conference ... for and about artists facing health
issues, as well as for non-disabled artists, arts administrators and
anyone interested in creativity, diversity and accomplishment.

One of the best gatherings on this topic, with more than 15 speakers and
workshops, and outstanding networking opportunities. In workshops, learn
more about creativity and aging, maximizing employment opportunities,
career transitions, grant writing, health insurance and more. Plus hear
from speakers who are artists/performers who are themselves dealing with
health issues and disability and are living active, creative and
accomplished lives in and through the arts.

Find more information about the conference and about Steven Dahlberg's
workshop:
<http://appliedimagination.org/events/artistsintransition.htm>
Download a PDF of complete conference information, including workshop
descriptions:
<http://appliedimagination.org/ait.pdf>

-----------------------------------------
The Creativity Networking Series is curated and hosted by Steven
Dahlberg, who heads the International Centre for Creativity and
Imagination and teaches "Creativity + Social Change" at the University
of Connecticut.

The Creativity Networking Series is presented by The Silo at Hunt Hill
Farm and the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination, both based
in New Milford, Connecticut. Creativity Networking is normally held at 2
p.m. on one Sunday each month at The Silo. The series provides a forum
for exploring the many facets of creativity and for discovering other
people interested in creativity. Through interesting topics and guests,
the series seeks to help people rediscover and reconnect with their
inherent creativity and explore new ways of expressing it.

Monday, March 29, 2010

Creativity and successful brain aging: Going with the flow

[23 March 2010 - Psychology Today] Creativity and flexible attitudes can promote healthy brain aging ... Scholars have suspected for decades that the aging process is kinder to the creative, active, and flexible mind. Now there is more convincing evidence than ever before to support the importance of keeping an open mind to helping your brain age successfully. In a recent scientific article, psychologists Susan McFadden and Anne Basting point out that "What's good for the person is usually good for the brain." They note that the more diverse the older person's social network, the greater the resistance to infection and disease, and the less the cognitive decline. It's not just the plain fact that you have many friends, but that if you have many friends, the chances are good that you are engaging in a variety of cognitively enriching activities. Even Facebook offers cognitive stimulation. Sure, you may get fed up with the 29th comment on the day's weather from people complaining it's too cold or reveling that it's a warm spring day, but even this virtual set of friendship connections is keeping your brain cells if not your fingers clicking. More

Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Optimism Boosts the Immune System

[23 March 2010 - Association for Psychological Science] Feeling better about the future might help you feel better for real. In a new study, psychological scientists Suzanne Segerstrom of the University of Kentucky and Sandra Sephton of the University of Louisville studied how law students' expectations about the future affected their immune response. Their conclusions: Optimism may be good for your health. More

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Creativity in the Classroom Workshop at The Aldrich - Monday

CREATIVITY IN THE CLASSROOM
A creative education workshop for teachers, administrators, and parents
... with Facilitator Steven Dahlberg, Director, International Centre
for Creativity and Imagination
==========================
MONDAY, MARCH 22, 2010, 4:00-6:30 P.M.
The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
258 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877
$30 (members)/$35 (non-members)
.2 CEUs available
Register online:
http://www.aldrichart.org/events/?id=642
==========================

CREATIVITY IN THE CLASSROOM
Creativity includes -- and is more than -- the arts. Creative thinking
is a twenty-first century skill that applies to all subjects, all grade
levels, and all ages. It is a skill that prepares students and adults
for a rapidly changing world, where complex problems do not have
pre-defined, easy solutions.
Creativity involves creative and critical thinking skills that can be
taught, practiced, and applied in all curriculums. In this workshop, you
will:
* Explore what creativity is, who has it, and how to unleash more of it.
* Think about thinking ... and learn how to think in new ways.
* Learn and practice applied creative thinking skills.
* Discover styles and types of creative thinking within the creative
process.
* Connect creativity to the classroom.

ABOUT THE FACILITATOR
Steven Dahlberg is head of the International Centre for Creativity and
Imagination, which is dedicated to applying creativity to improve the
well-being of individuals, organizations and communities. He works with
the Public and Community Engagement program at the University of
Connecticut,
where he teaches the "Creativity + Social Change" course. More info at:
http://www.appliedimagination.org

REGISTER NOW
For registration and further information please contact:
Suzanne Ryan
Museum Educator
The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
seryan @ aldrichart . org
203.438.4519

Friday, March 12, 2010

Carnegie Mellon research provides insight into brain's decision-making process

[11 March 2010 - EurekAlert! - Carnegie Mellon University] Replaying recent events in the area of the brain called the hippocampus may have less to do with creating long-term memories, as scientists have suspected, than with an active decision-making process, suggests a new study by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Minnesota Medical School. ... "Based on these observations, we have to rethink what is the role of replay for memory," wrote neuroscientists Dori Derdikman and May-Britt Moser of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in a commentary also published in the March 11 issue of Neuron. They suggested that replay in the hippocampus may prove to have a dual role -- both for memory consolidation and for making cognitive maps of the environment. More

Monday, March 01, 2010

Visual/Performing Artists Health Issues Conference - April 14 in Connecticut

The International Centre for Creativity and Imagination is pleased to be one of more than 100 arts, health, educational and advocacy organizations co-sponsoring the Artists in Transition conference on April 11, 2010, in Danbury, Connecticut. Additional co-sponsors include Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation, Andy Warhol Foundation, Actors Fund of America, Chamber Music America, and Merce Cunningham Foundation, among others. Steven Dahlberg will be leading a session (I-9) on "Creative Thinking, Aging and Living: Engaging our Strengths, Living our Purpose." This session will take participants on a journey through creativity, more specifically the creative thinking process, which engages our strengths and purpose. You will explore insights about positivity, strengths, adaptability, and neuroscience in tapping into and harnessing one's creativity in living more meaningful lives.

[1 March 2010 - Artists in Transition] Artists in Transition -- an organization that works with artists and performers facing physical and/or mental health issues that affect their ability to create or perform -- is having its inaugural conference on Sunday, April 11, 2010, from 12:00 to 5:00 p.m. at Western Connecticut State University in Danbury, Connecticut, USA. The conference is being co-sponsored by more than 100 local, state and national arts, health, educational and advocacy organizations.

Inspiring architect/sculptor Tom Luckey will keynote the event and awesome musical entertainment will be provided by Our Time Theatre. There will be outstanding networking opportunities and 15 information-packed breakout sessions on diverse subjects such as healthcare, maximizing employment potential, grant writing, creativity and purpose, etc. Speakers will include artists and performers who themselves are dealing with health and disability issues and making their art and lives a creative force.

Sign up now to be part of this informational and inspirational event. Check out the event Web site for complete conference and registration information (REGISTRATION CLOSES MARCH 13).

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Saturday, February 06, 2010

Creativity Matters Workshop in Connecticut - February 8

Creativity Matters: Engaging Creativity and Innovation in Work
- A Housatonic Valley Cultural Alliance Roundtable -
... with Creativity Educator Steven Dahlberg
==================
Creativity matters in all aspects of society, work and life. The imagination mindset helps us think in new ways ... which produces creative ideas and solutions ... and ultimately leads to innovation. If you want to unleash your imagination and explore new ways of expressing your creativity in meaningful ways, don't miss this interdisciplinary networking forum for artists, educators, business people, entrepreneurs and others who are interested. Come and explore what creativity is, who has it, how it relates to purpose and work – and how one can tap into more of it both personally and professionally. The workshop will be led by Steven Dahlberg, who heads the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination and teaches "Creativity + Social Change" at the University of Connecticut.

7:00–9:00 PM
Monday, February 8, 2010
@ Western Connecticut State University
Midtown Campus | Alumni Hall
181 White Street, Danbury, Connecticut 06810
This program is free and open to all. Refreshments provided. RSVP requested to 203 798 0760 or info@hvculturalarts.org.

>>>>>>>>>> When people are doing work that they love and they’re allowed to deeply engage in it – and when the work itself is valued and recognized – then creativity will flourish. Even in tough times.
-- TERESA AMABILE, DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH, HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL <<<<<<<<<<

Sponsored By:
HOUSATONIC VALLEY CULTURAL ALLIANCE
http://www.hvculturalarts.org
and
WESTERN CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS
http://www.wcsu.edu/svpa/

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP FACILITATOR:
Steven Dahlberg is director of the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination, which is dedicated to applying creativity to improve the well-being of individuals, organizations and communities. He teaches "Creativity + Social Change" in the Public and Community Engagement program at the University of Connecticut. He has worked with Yale University, Guggenheim Museum, Yahoo!, Americans for the Arts, Danbury Public Schools, World Knowledge Forum, City of Providence, 3M, Aldrich Museum, State of Connecticut, and Rhode Island College, among other organizations. He helped toy inventors launch a creativity consulting business and taught an undergraduate creativity course for incarcerated men. He is particularly interested in creative community building, creative education, local food and sustainable agriculture, and creative aging.
http://www.appliedimagination.org

Labels: , , ,

Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Creativity: What Is It? - Creativity Networking Series to Launch in January 2010

==========================
CREATIVITY NETWORKING: Creativity: What Is It?
... with educator Steven Dahlberg
==========================
SUNDAY, JANUARY 10, 2010, 2:00-3:30 P.M.
The Silo at Hunt Hill Farm, 44 Upland Road, New Milford, Connecticut
06776. $10; open to all. RSVP to 860.355.0300 or
culbertsonv@hunthillfarmtrust.org.

Creativity matters in all aspects of society. If you want to reconnect
with your inherent creativity and explore new ways of expressing it,
don't miss this series, which will be held at 2 p.m. on the second
Sunday of each month at The Silo at Hunt Hill Farm in New Milford,
Connecticut. The series will cover topics about creativity in all forms
(including, but not limited to, arts) -- creative thinking, creative
communities, creativity and education, creativity in organizations,
creative persons, the creative process, creative aging, creativity and
movement, creativity and spirituality, and more. In the first session on
January 10, come and explore the general topic of "what is creativity?"
-- plus, who has it, and how one can tap into more creativity both
personally and professionally. Steven Dahlberg, who will host the
series, also will lead the kick-off session in January. Dahlberg is the
head of the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination and
teaches "Creativity + Social Change" at the University of Connecticut.

Please print and post this flyer to spread the word about the series:
http://appliedimagination.org/jan2010.pdf

The Creativity Networking Series is presented by The Silo at Hunt Hill
Farm and the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination, both
based in New Milford, Conn. The series provides a forum for exploring
the many facets of creativity and for discovering other people
interested in creativity.

ABOUT THE FACILITATOR:
Steven Dahlberg is head of the International Centre for Creativity and
Imagination, which is dedicated to applying creativity to improve the
well-being of individuals, organizations and communities. He works with
the Public and Community Engagement program at the University of
Connecticut, where he teaches the "Creativity + Social Change" course.
Dahlberg collaborates with artists, scientists, business people,
educators, nonprofit and government professionals, and others to help
people develop and apply their creativity. His work includes directing
international creativity and training conferences, teaching
undergraduate and graduate courses in creativity, helping toy inventors
launch a creativity consulting business, collaborating on participatory
public art projects, serving as an adviser to the Guggenheim Museum, and
teaching creativity to incarcerated men. He regularly contributes to
various media (including WNPR), edits the Applied Imagination blog, and
authored the foreword to Education is Everybody's Business.
http://www.appliedimagination.org

ABOUT HUNT HILL FARM:
Custom cooking classes, shopping, tasting, museum tours, slide shows,
and gallery talks are among the offerings for groups and tours visiting
Hunt Hill Farm. Located in the Litchfield Hills of western Connecticut,
Hunt Hill Farm has been the location of the Silo since 1972 -- a
combination cooking school, art gallery, and gourmet kitchenware/food
store. Now operating under the auspices of the Hunt Hill Farm Trust as a
nonprofit organization for preservation, the farm is also host to the
Skitch Henderson Museum and Hunt Hill Farm Land Preserve.
http://www.hunthillfarmtrust.org/

Tuesday, December 08, 2009

Living Your Purpose Through Creativity - Listen Live Thursday

[7 December 2009 - The Intuitive Path with Anja Weiland] Anja's topic for this episode will be "Living Your Purpose Through Creativity" with Steven Dahlberg, head of the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination. Steven is dedicated to helping others develop and apply their creativity for their overall well-being. He works with individuals, organizations, businesses, and educational institutions. We will speak about the relevance of creative thinking in uncovering and realizing our purpose in life and career. Steven will give us an insight into the creative thinking process and share useful tips and resources that we can implement in our lives instantly. More
Thursday, December 10, 2009
12:30pm - 1:00pm EST
Listen live or streamed online:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/TheIntuitivePath
Or live via call-in by phone at:
+1 646 721 9435

Monday, November 23, 2009

New, Free Book - Neuroeducation: Learning, Arts, and the Brain

[23 November 2009 - Dana Foundation] Neuroeducation: Learning, Arts, and the Brain, the culmination of a summit sponsored by The Johns Hopkins University School of Education’s Neuro-Education Initiative, focuses on the convergence of neuroscientific research and teaching and learning, with an emphasis on the arts. This free publication features a prolegomenon by the late Dana Chairman William Safire and full text of the keynote address given by Jerome Kagan, Ph.D., Harvard University, at the Hopkins summit. Highlights of the symposium are featured in an executive summary, edited transcripts of panel presentations, and a synthesis of roundtable discussions. Neuroeducation: Learning, Arts, and the Brain is available free by written request on institutional letterhead. Please make certain your request contains a complete telephone number-including area code-and a full street address. (We cannot ship to P.O. Boxes). Requests should be mailed or faxed to:
Johanna Goldberg
Dana Foundation
745 Fifth Avenue, Suite 900
New York, NY 10151
Fax: (212) 317-8721
You may also e-mail your request to: jgoldberg@dana.org. Please include your institutional and mailing information. More

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Creative Aging Field Loses One of Its Key Leaders: In Memory of Gene D. Cohen, M.D., Ph.D.

[10 November 2009 - National Center for Creative Aging] Last Saturday night, we lost one of our key leaders in the field of creative aging – more so our very dear friend. NCCA was blessed to have been closely associated with Dr. Cohen not only as one of the founding members of the Board of Directors but as our faculty host at George Washington University, where both NCCA and his Center on Aging, Health and Humanities are housed within the Health Sciences Department. NCCA came into this partnership to bring Dr. Cohen’s and other outstanding researchers work into practice. It has been a great honor to work closely with Dr. Cohen and his brilliant work. On the behalf of the National Center for Creative Aging, we look forward to building upon Dr. Cohen’s legacy with you to move the paradigm of aging from problem to potential. In association with the Gerontological Society of America, where Dr. Cohen served as President in1997, NCCA will announce next week the formation of the Gene D. Cohen Research Award in Creative Aging at the GSA Annual conference in Atlanta . We will be releasing further details as plans progress and ask for your support in continuing Dr. Cohen’s research through promoting this award opportunity and other tributes that will be developing within our field in honor of him. We have included the family’s obituary and a photograph for your further information and distribution. Gene touched so many lives and leaves us with such a rich legacy on which to continue his work to improve the quality of life for older people. Our thoughts and prayers are with Dr. Cohen’s family. We are also working with George Washington University as caretakers for the Center for Aging, Health and Humanities which will continue in a robust form to advance Dr. Cohen’s scholarship. With sympathy, Gay Hanna, Executive Director, National Center for Creative Aging - More

DREAMS: JUST BRAIN EXERCISE

[10 November 2009 - Discovery Channel] ... Psychologists like Freud and Jung have long cashed in on the potency of dreams and how they may reflect our inner emotional lives. But new research suggests dreams may simply be the brain, well, taking a jog. Just as a morning run can help tune up the body, dreaming may be the brain's way of tuning up the mind while conscious thoughts aren’t dominating the circuits. More

Thursday, October 29, 2009

Tai Chi exercise reduces knee osteoarthritis pain in the elderly, research shows

[29 October 2009 - EurekAlert!/Arthritis Care & Research] Regular sessions improve physical function, depression and overall health. ... Researchers from Tufts University School of Medicine have determined that patients over 65 years of age with knee osteoarthritis (OA) who engage in regular Tai Chi exercise improve physical function and experience less pain. Tai Chi (Chuan) is a traditional style of Chinese martial arts that features slow, rhythmic movements to induce mental relaxation and enhance balance, strength, flexibility, and self-efficacy. Full findings of the study are published in the November issue of Arthritis Care & Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology. More